Do you have Bad Breath?

Lindsay Dentists, Periodontist, Peterborough, Dentists, Kawarthas,Whether you call it bad breath or halitosis, it’s an unpleasant condition that’s cause for embarrassment. If you’re concerned about bad breath, see your dentist. Bad breath can be caused by a number of sources, and he or she can help identify the cause and determine the best treatment.

What causes bad breath?

  • Food. What you eat affects the air you exhale, like garlic or onions. If you don’t brush and floss daily, particles of food can remain in the mouth, collecting bacteria, which can cause bad breath. Dieters may develop unpleasant breath from infrequent eating.
  • Gum disease. Persistent bad breath or a bad taste in the mouth can also be one of the warning signs of gum disease; which is caused by plaque.
  • Dry mouth. This occurs when the flow of saliva decreases and can be caused by various medications, salivary gland problems or continuously breathing through the mouth. Without enough saliva, food particles are not cleaned away. If you suffer from dry mouth, your dentist may prescribe an artificial saliva, or suggest using sugarless candy or increase your fluid intake.
  • Smoking and tobacco. In addition to staining teeth and being bad for overall health, tobacco can add to bad breath. Tobacco reduces your ability to taste foods and irritates gum tissues. Tobacco users are more likely to suffer from gum disease and are at greater risk for developing oral cancer. If you use tobacco, ask your dentist for tips on kicking the habit.
  • Medical conditions. Some diseases have symptoms related to bad breath. Sinus or lung infections, bronchitis, diabetes, and some liver or kidney diseases may be associated with bad breath.

If you’re concerned about what’s causing your bad breath, make an appointment to see your dentist. Regular checkups allow your dentist to detect any problems such as gum disease or dry mouth. Bad breath may be the sign of a medical disorder. If your dentist determines that your mouth is healthy, you may be referred to your primary care physician.

Maintaining good oral hygiene, eliminating gum disease and scheduling regular professional cleanings are essential to reducing bad breath. Brush twice a day and clean between your teeth daily with floss. Brush your tongue, too. If you wear dentures, be sure to remove them at night and clean them thoroughly before replacing them the next morning.

It’s important to note that mouthwash will only mask the odour temporarily. Mouthwashes are generally cosmetic and do not have a long-lasting effect on bad breath. If you must constantly use a breath freshener to hide unpleasant mouth odour, see your dentist. (ADA)

Braganza Periodontics – Peterborough Periodontist, Dental Implant and Gum Specialist

Dr. Annabel Braganza

Peterborough Periodontist, Gum and Dental Implant Specialist

1119 Clonsilla Avenue, Peterborough, Ontario K9J 5Y6

Call Us Today: 705-741-1885

705-741-1885

The Importance of Regular Saliva Flow – Peterborough Periodontist

Saliva Flow, Peterborough Periodontist, Gum Specialist, Saliva, or spit, plays a significant role in maintaining oral health. It is derived from blood and acts as the bloodstream of the mouth. What this means is, like blood, saliva helps build and maintain the health of soft and hard tissues. When saliva flow is reduced oral health problems such as tooth decay and other oral infections can occur. Chewing is the most efficient way to stimulate salivary flow. It causes muscles to compress the salivary glands and release saliva.

Saliva also:

  • Washes away food and debris from teeth and gums
  • Helps moisten and break down food to ease swallowing and enhances ability to taste
  • Provides disease-fighting substances throughout your mouth to help prevent cavities and other infections
  • Helps keep the surface of your teeth strong by providing high levels of calcium, fluoride and phosphate ions at the tooth surface.

In addition to keeping your mouth healthy, saliva may contain indicators of health concerns as well. Since it shares many properties with blood, the use of saliva to detect and diagnose oral diseases and other diseases that could affect your general health is being studied. Researchers have reported promising results in the use of saliva for the diagnosis of breast cancer, oral cancers, gum disease and viral hepatitis. Saliva is already used for rapid HIV testing.

Dr. Annabel Braganza

Peterborough Periodontics
705-741-1885

How well you brush is more important than how often you brush.

Tooth Brushing, Dental Health, Peterborough Dentists, Kawarthas Periodontists, Gum Specialists, Dental Implant Dentist Peterborough,How well you brush your teeth is more important than how often you brush. Remember it’s the spots you miss where the problems start. Here’s five tips to improve your brushing:

  1. Take the time to carefully and gently clean each tooth, ideally twice a day. The average person brushes for less than 35 seconds. A good brushing takes at least two to three minutes. Quick Tip: Keep brushing for as long as a song.
  2. Be gentle, particularly when cleaning where the gums meet the teeth. Hold the brush at a 45-degree angle to the gumline, and gently work the bristles back and forth using short strokes. Don’t forget to brush your tongue, too.
  3. Use a soft toothbrush which is less likely to damage your teeth and gums. Choose a size and shape that enables you to easily reach every tooth.
  4. Be sure to change your toothbrush frequently. Every three months is recommended; more often if you’ve been ill. Quick Tip:  New season – New toothbrush.
  5. Remember to floss too, since no amount of careful brushing, can clean between your teeth!

Information as per the Ontario Dental Association.

Dr. Annabel Braganza

Peterborough Periodontics
705-741-1885

Peterborough Periodontist, Kawarthas Dentists, Top Dentists in Peterborough, Gum Specialists, Dental Implant Specialist Peterborough,

Best Toothpaste For Your Teeth – Peterborough Periodontist

Brushed tooth copyWith so many types, brands and flavours of toothpaste, it can sometimes be overwhelming choosing the right one for you and your family. Truth is, you can’t really go wrong with any toothpaste as long as it carries the Canadian Dental Association Seal. Simple way to choose: The one you like enough to use every single day!

With this being said, different toothpastes offer different benefits in addition to cleaning your teeth. Some of which are: Tartar Control, Whitening, Sensitivity, Cavity Protection and Gum Protection.

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough Periodontist, Implant and Gum Specialist

705-741-1885

Gum Disease Risk Factors – Peterborough/Kawarthas Periodontists*

Bleeding Gums, Healthy Gums, Peterborough Periodontists, Kawarthas Periodontists, Peterborough Dentists, Top Dentist in Peterborough, Dental Cleaning, Teeth Cleaning, Scaling and Root Planing, Deep Teeth Cleaning, Gum Disease,AGE

Studies indicate that older people have the highest rates of periodontal disease. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates that over 70% of Americans 65 and older have periodontitis.

SMOKING/TOBACCO USE

Tobacco use is linked with many serious illnesses such as cancer, lung disease and heart disease, as well as numerous other health problems. Tobacco users also are at increased risk for periodontal disease. Studies have shown that tobacco use may be one of the most significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease.

GENETICS

Research has indicated that some people may be genetically susceptible to gum disease. Despite aggressive oral care habits, these people may be more likely to develop periodontal disease. Identifying these people with a genetic test before they even show signs of the disease and getting them into early intervention treatment may help them keep their teeth for a lifetime.

Bleeding Gums, Healthy Gums, Peterborough Periodontists, Kawarthas Periodontists, Peterborough Dentists, Top Dentist in Peterborough, Dental Cleaning, Teeth Cleaning, Scaling and Root Planing, Deep Teeth Cleaning, Gum Disease,STRESS

Stress is linked to many serious conditions such as hypertension, cancer, and numerous other health problems. Stress also is a risk factor for periodontal disease. Research demonstrates that stress can make it more difficult for the body to fight off infection, including periodontal diseases.

MEDICATIONS

Some drugs, such as oral contraceptives, anti-depressants, and certain heart medicines, can affect your oral health. Just as you notify your pharmacist and other health care providers of all medicines you are taking and any changes in your overall health, you should also inform your dental care provider.

CLENCHING OR GRINDING YOUR TEETH

Clenching or grinding your teeth can put excess force on the supporting tissues of the teeth and could speed up the rate at which these periodontal tissues are destroyed.

OTHER SYSTEMIC DISEASES

Other systemic diseases that interfere with the body’s inflammatory system may worsen the condition of the gums. These include cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis.

POOR NUTRITION AND OBESITY

A diet low in important nutrients can compromise the body’s immune system and make it harder for the body to fight off infection. Because periodontal disease begins as an infection, poor nutrition can worsen the condition of your gums. In addition, research has shown that obesity may increase the risk of periodontal disease.

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough Periodontist, Implant and Gum Specialist

705-741-1885

Information on Periodontitis – Peterborough Gum Specialist

PERIODONTITISPeterborough Gum Specialist, Peterborough Implant Specialist, Gum Disease,

Untreated gingivitis can advance to periodontitis. With time, plaque can spread and grow below the gum line. Toxins produced by the bacteria in plaque irritate the gums. The toxins stimulate a chronic inflammatory response in which the body in essence turns on itself, and the tissues and bone that support the teeth are broken down and destroyed. Gums separate from the teeth, forming pockets (spaces between the teeth and gums) that become infected. As the disease progresses, the pockets deepen and more gum tissue and bone are destroyed. Often, this destructive process has very mild symptoms. Eventually, teeth can become loose and may have to be removed.

There are many forms of periodontitis. The most common ones include the following.

  1. Aggressive periodontitis occurs in patients who are otherwise clinically healthy. Common features include rapid attachment loss and bone destruction and familial aggregation.
  2. Chronic periodontitis results in inflammation within the supporting tissues of the teeth, progressive attachment and bone loss. This is the most frequently occurring form of periodontitis and is characterized by pocket formation and/or recession of the gingiva. It is prevalent in adults, but can occur at any age. Progression of attachment loss usually occurs slowly, but periods of rapid progression can occur.
  3. Periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic diseases often begins at a young age. Systemic conditions such as heart disease, respiratory disease, and diabetes are associated with this form of periodontitis.
  4. Necrotizing periodontal disease is an infection characterized by necrosis of gingival tissues, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. These lesions are most commonly observed in individuals with systemic conditions such as HIV infection, malnutrition and immunosuppression. (AAP)

Peterborough Implant and Gum Specialist

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough  Periodontics and Implant Specialist

705-741-1885

PREVENTING PERIODONTAL DISEASE Peterborough Periodontist

Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is caused when bacteria in plaque (a sticky, colorless film that forms in the mouth) builds up between the gums and teeth. When the bacteria begin to grow, the gums surrounding the tooth can become inflamed.

Peterborough Periodontics, Flossing, Gum Disease, If left untreated, this inflammation can cause the gums and supporting bone structure to deteriorate. This can lead to gum recession or even tooth loss. In addition, research has shown that gum disease may be associated with other diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease.

Luckily, periodontal disease can be preventable. Adding these habits to your daily routine can help.

Brush your teeth. Brushing after meals helps remove food debris and plaque trapped between your teeth and gums. Don’t forget to include your tongue, bacteria loves to hide there.

Floss. Flossing at least once a day helps remove food particles and plaque between teeth and along the gum line that your toothbrush can’t quite reach.

Swish with mouthwash. Using a mouthwash can help reduce plaque and can remove remaining food particles that brushing and flossing missed.

Know your risk. Age, smoking, diet and genetics can all increase your risk for periodontal disease. If you are at increased risk, be sure to talk with your dental professional.

See a periodontist. Get an annual comprehensive periodontal evaluation (CPE) from a dental professional. A CPE looks at your teeth, plaque level, gums, bite, bone structure and other risk factors for periodontal disease. Identifying symptoms of gum disease early is key to protecting your teeth and gums. (AAP)

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough Periodontist, Implant and Gum Specialist

705-741-1885