Gum Disease In Men – Impotency, Heart Disease, Prostate and Cancer

Periodontal health for men is extremely important as it may impact a variety of other health factors.

Research has found that periodontal disease is higher in men (56.4 percent) than in women (38.4 percent). This may be because men are less likely to go to the dentist or because men have worse indicators of periodontal health than women, including higher incidence of dental plaque, tartar, and bleeding on probing. However, periodontal health for men is extremely important as it may impact a variety of other health factors.

Peterborough Periodontist, Gum Specialist Peterborough, Gum Disease, Impotency, Heart Disease, Strokes,  PROSTATE HEALTH

Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an enzyme created in the prostate that is normally secreted in very small amounts. However, when the prostate becomes inflamed, infected, or affected by cancer, PSA levels rise. Research has shown that men with indicators of periodontal disease such as red, swollen or tender gums  as well as prostatitis (inflammation of the prostate) have higher levels of PSA than men with only one of the conditions. This means that prostate health may be associated with periodontal health, and vice versa.

HEART DISEASE

Research indicates that periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease are associated; having periodontal disease may actually increase your risk of cardiovascular disease. Both diseases are chronic inflammatory conditions, and researchers believe that inflammation is the connection between gum disease and heart disease. Since men are already more likely to develop heart disease than women, maintaining periodontal health is another way to reduce this risk.

IMPOTENCE

Men with periodontal disease, especially those younger than 30 or older than 70, are at increased risk of developing impotence, according to research. Researchers believe that inflammation may be the link between the two conditions; prolonged chronic inflammation (the same type of inflammation that is associated with periodontal disease) can damage blood vessels leading to impotence.

CANCER

Research has found that men with a history of gum disease are 14 percent more likely to develop cancer than men with healthy gums. Specifically, men with periodontal disease may be 49 percent more likely than women to develop kidney cancer, 54 percent more likely to develop pancreatic cancer, and 30 percent more likely to develop blood cancers.

Braganza Periodontics – Peterborough Periodontist

705-741-1885

GUM DISEASE AND HEART DISEASE

HEART DISEASE

Several studies have shown that periodontal disease is associated with heart disease. While a cause-and-effect relationship has not yet been proven, research has indicated that periodontal disease increases the risk of heart disease.

Scientists believe that inflammation caused by periodontal disease may be responsible for the association.

Periodontal disease can also exacerbate existing heart conditions. Patients at risk for infective endocarditis may require antibiotics prior to dental procedures. Your periodontist and cardiologist will be able to determine if your heart condition requires use of antibiotics prior to dental procedures.

STROKE

Additional studies have pointed to a relationship between periodontal disease and stroke. In one study that looked at the causal relationship of oral infection as a risk factor for stroke, people diagnosed with acute cerebrovascular ischemia were found more likely to have an oral infection when compared to those in the control group. (AAP)

For more information be sure to contact one of our periodontal professionals.

Healthy Life, Heart Disease, Peterborough Periodontist, Dental Implant and Gum Specialist, Gum Disease,

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough Periodontist, Dental Implant and Gum Specialist

705-741-1885

Smoking and Tobacco Use Risk Factors Peterborough Periodontist

As Time To Quit Smokingtobacco use is linked to many serious illnesses such as cancer, lung and heart disease and a number of other health problems, tobacco use also increases the risk for periodontal disease. Studies have shown that tobacco use may be one of the most significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease.

If you are a smoker be sure to speak with your dentist/periodontist to find the most effective way to quit …… Your gums will thank you for it!

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough Gum Specialist

705-741-1885