Does your child have periodontal disease? Peterborough Periodontist

Little Baby Girl Sitting At Dental Chair With Open Mouth And FeeSIGNS OF GUM DISEASE IN CHILDREN

Bleeding
Bleeding gums during tooth brushing, flossing or any other time

Puffiness
Swollen and bright red gums

Recession
Gums that have receded away from the teeth, sometimes exposing the roots

Bad breath
Constant bad breath that does not clear up with brushing and flossing

IMPORTANCE OF GOOD DENTAL HYGIENE IN ADOLESCENCE

Hormonal changes related to puberty can put teens at greater risk for getting periodontal disease. During puberty, an increased level of hormones, such as progesterone and possibly estrogen, cause increased blood circulation to the gums. This may cause an increase in the gum’s sensitivity and lead to a greater reaction to any irritation, including food particles and plaque. During this time, the gums may become swollen, turn red and feel tender.

As a teen progresses through puberty, the tendency for the gums to swell in response to irritants will lessen. However, during puberty, it is very important to follow a good at-home dental hygiene regimen, including regular brushing and flossing, and regular dental care. In some cases, a dental professional may recommend periodontal therapy to help prevent damage to the tissues and bone surrounding the teeth.

ADVICE FOR PARENTS

Early diagnosis is important for successful treatment of periodontal diseases. Therefore, it is important that children receive a comprehensive periodontal examination as part of their routine dental visits. Be aware that if your child has an advanced form of periodontal disease, this may be an early sign of systemic disease. A general medical evaluation should be considered for children who exhibit severe periodontitis, especially if it appears resistant to therapy.

The most important preventive step against periodontal disease is to establish good oral health habits with your child. There are basic preventive steps to help your child maintain good oral health:

  • Establish good dental hygiene habits early. When your child is 12 months old, you can begin using toothpaste when brushing his or her teeth.   When the gaps between your child’s teeth close, it’s important to start flossing.
  • Serve as a good role model by practicing good dental hygiene habits yourself.
  • Schedule regular dental visits for family checkups, periodontal evaluations and cleanings.
  • Check your child’s mouth for the signs of periodontal disease, including bleeding gums, swollen and bright red gums, gums that are receding away from the teeth and bad breath.

American Academy of Periodontology

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough Periodontist Implant and Gum Specialist

705-741-1885

Information on PREVENTING PERIODONTAL DISEASE – Peterborough Periodontist

Peterborough Periodontics, Flossing, Gum Disease, Kawarthas Periodontists, Peterborough Dentists,

Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is caused when bacteria in plaque (a sticky, colorless film that forms in the mouth) builds up between the gums and teeth. When the bacteria begin to grow, the gums surrounding the tooth can become inflamed.

If left untreated, this inflammation can cause the gums and supporting bone structure to deteriorate. This can lead to gum recession or even tooth loss. In addition, research has shown that gum disease may be associated with other diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease.

Luckily, periodontal disease can be preventable. Adding these habits to your daily routine can help.

Brush your teeth. Brushing after meals helps remove food debris and plaque trapped between your teeth and gums. Don’t forget to include your tongue, bacteria loves to hide there.

Floss. Flossing at least once a day helps remove food particles and plaque between teeth and along the gum line that your toothbrush can’t quite reach.

Swish with mouthwash. Using a mouthwash can help reduce plaque and can remove remaining food particles that brushing and flossing missed.

Know your risk. Age, smoking, diet and genetics can all increase your risk for periodontal disease. If you are at increased risk, be sure to talk with your dental professional.

See a periodontist. Get an annual comprehensive periodontal evaluation (CPE) from a dental professional. A CPE looks at your teeth, plaque level, gums, bite, bone structure and other risk factors for periodontal disease. Identifying symptoms of gum disease early is key to protecting your teeth and gums. (AAP)

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough Periodontist, Implant and Gum Specialist

705-741-1885

*TYPES OF PERIODONTAL DISEASES IN CHILDREN *

Peterborough Periodontist Chronic gingivitis. aggressive periodontitis and generalized, aggressive periodontitis, types of gum disease in children.Chronic gingivitis is common in children. It usually causes gum tissue to swell, turn red and bleed easily. Gingivitis is both preventable and treatable with a regular routine of brushing, flossing and professional dental care. However, left untreated, it can eventually advance to more serious forms of periodontal disease.

Aggressive periodontitis can affect young people who are otherwise healthy. Localized aggressive periodontitis is found in teenagers and young adults and mainly affects the first molars and incisors. It is characterized by the severe loss of alveolar bone, and ironically, patients generally form very little dental plaque or calculus.

Generalized aggressive periodontitis may begin around puberty and involve the entire mouth. It is marked by inflammation of the gums and heavy accumulations of plaque and calculus. Eventually it can cause the teeth to become loose.

Braganza Periodontics – Peterborough Gum Specialist

705-741-1885

Tongue Piercings and Damage to Your Teeth *

Tongue Piercing, Damage to Teeth, Healthy teeth, Peterborough Periodontists, Kawarthats Dentists, Oral Health, Gum Disease, Cavities, Top Dentist in Peterborough,Risks associated with oral piercing:

  • Chipped Teeth
  • Cracked teeth that can not be fixed and need to be extracted
  • Drooling
  • Bad breath
  • Altered speech ie. lisping
  • Nerve damage
  • Loss of taste
  • Infection or the tissue around the piercing
  • Swallowing or chocking of all or parts of the piercing

ODHA Dental Hygiene Facts:

Ludwig’s angina is a life-threatening acute bacterial infection of the floor of the mouth caused when bacteria enter the bloodstream through the open wound (piercing site). This is a serious condition as the swelling from inflammation can block the air passage and prevent saliva from being swallowed.

Body piercers are not members of the medical profession: They do not review health history, prescribe antibiotics or provide post-op care.

Contaminated piercing equipment can lead to other infections such as blood borne hepatitis (B, C, D and G) as well as HIV and AIDS.

For more information visit ODHA Oral Piercing Dental Hygiene Facts.

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough Periodontist, Implant and Gum Specialist

705-741-1885

Gum Disease Risk Factors – Peterborough/Kawarthas Periodontists*

Bleeding Gums, Healthy Gums, Peterborough Periodontists, Kawarthas Periodontists, Peterborough Dentists, Top Dentist in Peterborough, Dental Cleaning, Teeth Cleaning, Scaling and Root Planing, Deep Teeth Cleaning, Gum Disease,AGE

Studies indicate that older people have the highest rates of periodontal disease. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates that over 70% of Americans 65 and older have periodontitis.

SMOKING/TOBACCO USE

Tobacco use is linked with many serious illnesses such as cancer, lung disease and heart disease, as well as numerous other health problems. Tobacco users also are at increased risk for periodontal disease. Studies have shown that tobacco use may be one of the most significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease.

GENETICS

Research has indicated that some people may be genetically susceptible to gum disease. Despite aggressive oral care habits, these people may be more likely to develop periodontal disease. Identifying these people with a genetic test before they even show signs of the disease and getting them into early intervention treatment may help them keep their teeth for a lifetime.

Bleeding Gums, Healthy Gums, Peterborough Periodontists, Kawarthas Periodontists, Peterborough Dentists, Top Dentist in Peterborough, Dental Cleaning, Teeth Cleaning, Scaling and Root Planing, Deep Teeth Cleaning, Gum Disease,STRESS

Stress is linked to many serious conditions such as hypertension, cancer, and numerous other health problems. Stress also is a risk factor for periodontal disease. Research demonstrates that stress can make it more difficult for the body to fight off infection, including periodontal diseases.

MEDICATIONS

Some drugs, such as oral contraceptives, anti-depressants, and certain heart medicines, can affect your oral health. Just as you notify your pharmacist and other health care providers of all medicines you are taking and any changes in your overall health, you should also inform your dental care provider.

CLENCHING OR GRINDING YOUR TEETH

Clenching or grinding your teeth can put excess force on the supporting tissues of the teeth and could speed up the rate at which these periodontal tissues are destroyed.

OTHER SYSTEMIC DISEASES

Other systemic diseases that interfere with the body’s inflammatory system may worsen the condition of the gums. These include cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis.

POOR NUTRITION AND OBESITY

A diet low in important nutrients can compromise the body’s immune system and make it harder for the body to fight off infection. Because periodontal disease begins as an infection, poor nutrition can worsen the condition of your gums. In addition, research has shown that obesity may increase the risk of periodontal disease.

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough Periodontist, Implant and Gum Specialist

705-741-1885

*Your Dental Cleaning – Scaling and Root Planing*

Peterborough Periodontists, Kawarthas Periodontists, Peterborough Dentists, Top Dentist in Peterborough, Dental Cleaning, Teeth Cleaning, Scaling and Root Planing, Deep Teeth Cleaning, Gum Disease,Scaling and root planing is a teeth cleaning above and below the gum-line all the way down to the bottom of the pockets of the teeth. The scaling part is when your dentist, periodontist or hygienist removes all the plaque and tartar from your teeth and the root planing part is the smoothing out of your teeth roots to help your gums reattach to your teeth. For some, this deep cleaning, may take more than one visit to complete and may require a local anesthetic.

It is normal to have tooth sensitivity for up to a week as the gums are healing around the teeth after a deep dental cleaning. Your gums also may also be swollen, feel tender and bleed.

Your dentist or periodontist will also schedule a follow up visit to see how your gums have healed and measure the depth of your pockets. If they have gotten deeper, more treatment may be needed.

Good dental care at home is essential to help keep your teeth and gums healthy. Brush your teeth twice a day with a soft brush, clean between your teeth daily, eat a balanced diet, avoid using tobacco and see your dentist and/or periodontist regularly.

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough Periodontics

705-741-1885

Information on Periodontitis – Peterborough Gum Specialist

PERIODONTITISPeterborough Gum Specialist, Peterborough Implant Specialist, Gum Disease,

Untreated gingivitis can advance to periodontitis. With time, plaque can spread and grow below the gum line. Toxins produced by the bacteria in plaque irritate the gums. The toxins stimulate a chronic inflammatory response in which the body in essence turns on itself, and the tissues and bone that support the teeth are broken down and destroyed. Gums separate from the teeth, forming pockets (spaces between the teeth and gums) that become infected. As the disease progresses, the pockets deepen and more gum tissue and bone are destroyed. Often, this destructive process has very mild symptoms. Eventually, teeth can become loose and may have to be removed.

There are many forms of periodontitis. The most common ones include the following.

  1. Aggressive periodontitis occurs in patients who are otherwise clinically healthy. Common features include rapid attachment loss and bone destruction and familial aggregation.
  2. Chronic periodontitis results in inflammation within the supporting tissues of the teeth, progressive attachment and bone loss. This is the most frequently occurring form of periodontitis and is characterized by pocket formation and/or recession of the gingiva. It is prevalent in adults, but can occur at any age. Progression of attachment loss usually occurs slowly, but periods of rapid progression can occur.
  3. Periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic diseases often begins at a young age. Systemic conditions such as heart disease, respiratory disease, and diabetes are associated with this form of periodontitis.
  4. Necrotizing periodontal disease is an infection characterized by necrosis of gingival tissues, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. These lesions are most commonly observed in individuals with systemic conditions such as HIV infection, malnutrition and immunosuppression. (AAP)

Peterborough Implant and Gum Specialist

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough  Periodontics and Implant Specialist

705-741-1885

Canadians are increasingly at risk for oral cancer – Peterborough Periodontists

Peterborough Periodontists, Gum Specialists Kawarthas, Oshawa Dentists, Gum Disease, Oral Cancer, Dental Cleaning,

Health Canada has made the following statement:

“A growing body of evidence suggests that Canadians are increasingly at risk for oral cancer. It is now the 13th most common diagnosed cancer in Canada. It is believed that extremely low awareness level on the risk factors and prevention behaviours, among the general population, and gaps in knowledge and practices on the part of health professionals that have contributed to increasing incidence and late stage diagnosis – often with fatal results.”…..”Oral cancer is both preventable and screenable.”

Approximately 70% of oral cancer is discovered at the late stage 3 or 4. Early diagnosis of oral cancer through screening and early detection is critical. Dental professionals are in a unique position to identify these lesions and give appropriate recommendations that expedite referral and treatment.

Risk factors related to oral cancer:

Peterborough Periodontists, Gum Specialists Kawarthas, Oshawa Dentists, Gum Disease, Oral Cancer, Dental Cleaning, 1 – Age and Gender – Men are more susceptible than women. Ratio of 2:1.
2 – High consumption of alcohol, especially when combined with the use of tobacco products (This includes smokeless tobacco, snuff, chewing tobacco, chewing betel quid, paan, areca nut, hookah, cigarettes and cigars).
3 – Prolonged exposure to UV light – Sun and tanning beds.
4 – Dietary factors – Diet low in fruits and vegetables.
5 – Chronic irritation.
6 – HPV infection (particularly strands 16 and 18)
There is an alarming emergence of an atypical profile. Historical risk factors are on the decline. The fastest growing segment of the oral cancer population is people between 20-30 years old who are non smokers. 70% of all new oral cancer victims have none of the historical risk factors.  This is attributed to the presence of human papillomavirus. HPV is the most prevalent sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., yet less than one third of the general population has even heard of it.
Oral cancer prevention:

Peterborough Periodontists, Gum Specialists Kawarthas, Oshawa Dentists, Gum Disease, Oral Cancer, Dental Cleaning, 1 – Reduce your alcohol consumption.
2 – Quit smoking and stop (reduce) using tobacco products.
3 – If sexually active be sure to use protection.
4 – When outside and exposed to the sun use sunscreen and lip balm with an SPF.
5 – Eat a healthy diet that is high in fruits and vegetables.
6 – Visit your dental professional regularly for cleanings and check ups.

PERIODONTAL/GUM DISEASE PROGRESSION – Peterborough/Kawarthas/Oshawa Periodontist

1. Plaque full of bacteria, that turns to calculus, builds up between the teeth and gums.

2. The gums become red and inflamed caused by the body’s reaction to the bacteria.

3. The bone recedes due to the inflammatory response to bacteria.

4. Pockets are formed (space between the tooth and gum) due to decreased bone tissue.

5.  If the gum disease is left untreated, over time the teeth become loose and may be lost.

Gum Disease, Gum Disease Progression, Peterborough Periodontist, Top Periodontist in Toronto, Kawarths Periodontists, Dentists in Oshawa, Dental Information, Periodontal Disease,

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough Periodontist Implant and Gum Specialist

705-741-1885

Is periodontal/gum disease contagious?

Peterborough Periodontist, Kawarthas Dentists, Peterborough Dentists, Information on Gum Disease, Periodontal Disease, Peterborough Gum Specialist, Kawarthas Dental Implants,

Is periodontal/gum disease contagious?

Research has shown that periodontal/gum disease is caused by the inflammatory reaction to bacteria under the gums, so periodontal disease technically may not be contagious. However, the bacteria that cause the inflammatory reaction can be spread through saliva. This means that if one of your family members has periodontal disease, it’s a good idea to avoid contact with their saliva by not sharing eating utensils or oral health equipment. If you notice that your spouse or a family member has the warning signs of a possible periodontal problem (bleeding, red and swollen gums, or bad breath) you may want to suggest that they see a dentist or periodontist for an exam. It may help to protect the oral health of everyone in the family. (APP)

Dr. Annabel Braganza – Peterborough Periodontist, Dental Implant and Gum Specialist

705-741-1885